90 Percent

Project management, productivity, change management, and more!

How to give bad project briefs

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Briefing the team to start a project is an important step contributing to the project’s success. How the brief is handled can be very indicative of how the project will
go.

However, even if it is very important, some remain unaware of the impact it has on the team to have an unacceptable project brief.

Here are below a few examples of bad project briefs. If you are guilty of anything similar to this, please review how you brief your team, I know you can do better than this. 🙂

1. The “Pass-by” brief

Situation:

  • You happen to pass by the person you need to brief on the project;
  • You stop him in the middle of the corridor and start briefing him on the project right here, right now; and
  • You give him a very high detail description like “It’s a mobile app”.

Result:

  • The brief takes 5-10 minutes;
  • No notes were taken;
  • No next actions were listed nor discussed;
  • The proper team members were not included; and
  • The person being briefed doesn’t necessarily have time for this today and now is stuck with a “surprise” new project he was not aware of.

2. The “Catch it” brief

Situation:

  • You go speak to the person and tell him a project is starting for a client and he should take care of it; and
  • You leave saying you don’t have more information for him…

Result:

  • The person is left completely clueless as to what to do; and
  • He knows he can’t ask questions since you have no more information.

3. The “high…very high level” brief

Situation:

  • You need to have an estimate done for a project;
  • You brief the person who will handle the estimate by informing him that you need an estimate for a “A micro-site”;
  • The person asks for more information; and
  • You answer… “Well it’s a micro-site!”

Result:

  • The person has no idea what to estimate and is frustrated by the lack of information.

4. The “New service” brief

  • You need to have an estimate done for a project;
  • You brief the person who will handle the estimate by informing him that you need to estimate a “Parade Float”; and
  • The person replies by saying “We do web here…” (which is true)

Result:

  • The person has no idea what to estimate; and
  • The person feels confusion around the new “service” we suddenly offer.

5. The “Client approval forward” brief

Situation:

  • You work hard to win a new client, not involving the team in any steps;
  • After much effort to win this new client, he decides to go forward with the project and sends his written approval in a mail;
  • You forward the approval mail to the team asking to start the project;
  • That’s it…

Result:

  • The team has no idea what is going on;
  • They are also discouraged by the “project brief” they just received.

6. The “When can it be done” brief

Situation:

  • You are in a meeting with a client who just agreed to have his websites done by your team;
  • Happy, you fetch the person responsible for production to meet the client;
  • Knowing he is completely clueless of the websites, you ask your colleague: “When can his websites be done?” while the client remains there, smiling, eager to know the answer.

Result:

  • Your colleague is put in a bad position where he is surprised, cannot answer, and must stay professional in front of the client; and
  • Gives a bad impression to client to see how his project started.

7. The “Client wants something else” brief

Situation:

  • Client gives you detailed information of what he needs;
  • You feel the client needs something else than what he his requesting; and
  • You brief the team according to what you think the client needs, and you do not share the original information the client provided to you.

Result:

  • The team is never able to satisfy the client, no matter how hard they try;
  • They are confused by the difference between what the client feedback says and what you say; and
  • Not only frustration build up, but so much time (and money) is wasted because of this.

In conclusion

Project briefs are the first impression of a project to your team, make sure it’s done right. Not only that, can you imagine if the clients knew how bad their project was transferred to the team? They would not feel confident the team could handle it, and they would be right.

Have you ever received a bad project brief? Share your story!

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